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ACE-72136 1/72 SNAR 10 Artillery Location Radar Vehicle model kit

Ace ACE-72136 1/72 SNAR 10 Artillery Location Radar Vehicle model kit
Price 24.90
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ACE-72136 1/72 SNAR 10 Artillery Location Radar Vehicle model kit

Ace 1/72 SNAR 10 Artillery Location Radar Vehicle model kit. Pic.1
Ace 1/72 SNAR 10 Artillery Location Radar Vehicle model kit. Pic.1

Ace 1/72 SNAR 10 Artillery Location Radar Vehicle model kit. Pic.2
Ace 1/72 SNAR 10 Artillery Location Radar Vehicle model kit. Pic.2

One of the most widely deployed battlefield surveillance radars of the former Soviet Union was the self-propelled SNAR-10 (Stantsyiya Nazemnoy Artilleriyskoy Razvedki) or"Big Fred" by NATO. The system is a battlefield surveillance radar with a limited artillery locating function. The SNAR-10 is unable to calculate the trajectories of projectiles or locate enemy artillery firing positions from their impact areas. However, the SNAR-10, can provide location data on stationary and moving battlefield targets. It is normally deployed close to infantry or artillery observation posts. The SNAR-10 can provide data on friendly artillery mission impact patterns and can record and registration fire. The SNAR-10 can also detect targets at sea as well as slow, low-flying helicopters and remotely piloted vehicles (RPVs). The SNAR-10 was introduced into service by the former Soviet Army in 1975. By the early 1980s, the SNAR-10 entered service with several members of the former Warsaw Pact as well as the former Yugoslavia Army. The SNAR-10 has a four-man crew. The SNAR-10 is based on the amphibious MT-LB tracked vehicle with cruising range is up to 475 kilo-meters with 475 liters of diesel fuel stowed in two tanks along each side-wall in the hull. The SNAR-10's communication equipment consists of two HFA/HF R-123M radios (20 to 51.5 MHz), two field telephones and the R-124 internal radio. To pinpoint position and direction, the SNAR-10 has a built-in navigation system and additional topographic equipment similar to the BRM1/3 surveillance and reconnaissance vehicles. The radar is a two-dimensional pulse doppler radar (the operator making the selection), with the complete system placed inside the turret (except for the power supply). In the pulse mode, it is impossible to distinguish between moving and stationary targets, and it is, therefore, not ideal for the surveillance of a saturated battlefield. To detect moving objects, the doppler mode is more suitable. The SNAR-10 was at one time a very capable system due to several improvements but is not as capable as the new Russian Zoopark-1 artillery counter-battery system. In 1997 the Strela Research Institute carried out upgrades of the SNAR-10 (SNAR-1 OM) radar. The primary objective of the upgrades was to replace the aged radar equipment, that dates to 1971, with a modern radar system featuring high survivability and maneuverability on the battlefield due to the use of an armored chassis and hull.